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The Hurdles With Helping Others Financially

I’m all about experimenting, I guess it’s the scientist in me that keeps trying to breakout of my work life that consists of a repeating grind that is way to familiar.

Recently, I decided to try an new financial experiment where I would take an attractive female or male (mostly female because I’m not a good judge of what an attractive male is), and try to teaching that person what I know and set them on a course of action that would improve their financial live  The person that I would teach would have to be willing and have capabilities beyond just good looks, so I’d have to delve a bit deeper than the surface.

happiness

So I’ve been on the lookout, and came up with an idea where I would even provide the potential person with a small income stream via working for me as a contributing author.  The small income stream was a side effect of another experiment that I will mention at a later date.  While not much, I calculated that I would be able to provide about $20 weekly (not much more than a kid’s allowance, but something), at least at first…

Most middle class kids wouldn’t be interested in my proposal, and although I could probably find many potential candidates at local colleges in my area, I decided to hit the bars first.  The idea that a young full time bartender would not be going to college and probably wouldn’t have the upbringing that a typical middle class kid would have.  So while not exactly more needy, the individual wouldn’t be trained in the same financial principles as the college kids probably had.  And so, that where I come to the crux of this article “The hurdles with helping others financially“.

Hurdle 1.  Approaching Potential Individuals

I decided to approach young females first.  The problem with approaching young females in a bar, is that they would think that I’m hitting on them.  So often time the female bartenders are on guard and don’t really trust me, at least in a short time-frame.  If I were to attend a bar for a long time (maybe 1 year), then they might trust me, but until such a relationship exists, it’s would be hard to extend such an offer (especially with very attractive female bartenders).  I have to admit, it’s hard for me to crack this egg, and I’m not a very outgoing person by nature.

Hurdle 2.  Lack of Fun Factor

Part of the experiment would be to teach the individual what I’ve learn and provide a very small additional income stream.  The problem is that bartending is probably pretty fun in contrast, so why would they want to try my experiment.  They don’t know what I know, so they might not see much benefit in trying what I would like to try.  I think if you don’t know that there is another way, you might be apt not to try any such suggestions.  I guess what I’m saying is it’s hard to believe when you don’t have the exposure to such a thing.  For all I know, perhaps it’s like believing in Fairy Tales?

Hurdle 3.  Perseverance and Follow-thru

What I would be teaching would require a lot of skills and disciplines that my target might not possess currently.  The individual would have to do all of the following:  Believe that it’s possible, have the perseverance to not cash your the accumulated money and stick to a strict wealth building routine.  Continue with the program that I would setup for them, even when I wouldn’t be there to offer encouragement.  Perhaps by teaching understanding and coolness towards money, this hurdle might be overcome with some hard work?

The above are some of the main hurdles I would face with this experiment.  I’m sure that I can provide benefit to others, but I might have to reconsider my candidate pool.

In the mean time, I’m running out of bars and bartenders…

More to come hopefully,

Don

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